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New on Geneanet: The Chromosome Browser (Shared DNA segments)

Posted by Jean-Yves on Feb 22, 2021

Geneanet DNA has been launched 1 year ago. On this occasion, we are happy to announce a new and much-awaited option: the Chromosome Browser (Shared DNA segments)!

Click “DNA” then “View DNA matches” in the main menu bar, or click the following link: en.geneanet.org/dna/person/.

Click a DNA match and the Chromosome Browser (Shared DNA segments) will show up at the bottom of the page.

The human genome consists of 22 pairs of chromosomes (also called autosomes, numbered from 1 to 22) and 1 pair of sex chromosomes (also called heterosomes, identified by X and Y). Each pair of chromosomes contains a paternal copy and a maternal copy.

In the Chromosome Browser, each pair of chromosomes shows up as an horizontal bar which length depends on the total number of bases they contain. The Y chromosome does not show up in this chart because it is not used for the identification of shared DNA.

Each pair of chromosomes can contain up to 3 different pieces of information:

  • The absence of shared DNA segment;
  • The presence of a half-identical shared DNA segment, which means that the DNA you share with your relative is present on only one copy of the chromosome, thus inherited from only one of your parents;
  • The presence of a full-identical shared DNA segment, which means that the DNA you share with your relative is present on both copies of the chromosome, thus inherited from both of your parents.

These additional information will help you to go further with your DNA relatives in particular, and with your genealogy research in general.

Please read our help page to learn more about it.

Good luck with your research!

View your DNA matches

Please post your questions in our forum

5 comments

Can you download all your matches at once?


I was very excited to discover so many French matches, but with the addition of the chromosome browser it is apparent most are false due to the pile up region on chromosome 1.


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