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Geneanet > Search > Origin of Names > Origin of the name DAVID

Names and first names

Origin of the name DAVID

Origin & Meanings
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GARDINER
This name may be derived from the same roots as Gairden. It is probably, however, the same as Gardener, the orthography having been changed. Camden says, Wise was the man that told my Lord Bishop (Stephen Gardiner, Bishop of Winchester) that his name was not Gardener as the English pronounce it, but Gardiner, with the French accent, and therefore a gentleman. The principal family of the Gardiners in this country derive their descent from Lion Gardiner, a native of Scotland, who served under General Fairfax in the Low Countries as an engineer. He was sent to this country in 1635, by Lords Say and Sele, Brooke, and others, to build a fort, and make a settlement on their grant at the mouth of the Connecticut river. He built the fort at Saybrook, which name he gave to it after the names of his patrons Lords Say and Brooke. His eldest son, David, born at Fort Saybrook, in 1636, was the first white child born in Connecticut He afterward bought from the Indians the island in Long Island Sound, called by them Monchonack, and by the English the Isle of Wight, paying for it. as the old records say, a black dog, a gun, and some Dutch blankets. He removed there with his family, and gave it the name of Gardiner's Island. The island still remains in the possession of the family, having descended in a direct line from Lion Gardiner.
CRAWFORD
Local. First assumed by the proprietor of the lands and barony of Crawford, in Lanarkshire, Scotland. The extreme ancestor of the ancient family of Crawford, in Scotland, was Reginald, youngest son of Alan, the fourth Earl of Richmond. He seems to have accompanied David the First to the north, and to have received extensive grants of land in Strath Cluyd, or Clydesdale, whence his immediate descendants adopted the name of Crawford, then forming one of the largest baronies in Scotland, and signifying in Gaelic The pass of blood from cru, bloody, and ford, a pass or way, as commemorative, probably, of some sanguinary conflict between the Aborigines and the Roman invaders. The name has been derived by others from crodh and port, pronounced cro-fort, signifying a sheltering place for cattle.
WISHART
Some ancient writers say, that Robert, son of David, Earl of Huntingdon, took on him the cross, and distinguished himself in the Holy Land, where, from his gallant exploits against the Saracens, he received the name of Guishart, that is, Wise-Heart, now Wishart.
MAXWELL
One Macchus, in the eleventh century, obtained lands, on the Tweed, in Scotland, from Prince David, to which he gave the name of Macchus-ville, since corrupted to Maxwell. Maxwell is Macsual, in Gaelic, from Mac, Son, and sual, small, little.
DAWSON
Said to be a corruption of the Nor. Fr. D'Ossone, from the town of Ossone, in Normandy. Camden, however, thinks it a contraction of Davison, the son of David, which is the more probable derivation.
DAVIS
A corruption of Davids; the son of David.
DEWEY
Dewi, in the Welsh, is a contraction or rather a corruption of David.
DIMOCK
(Welsh.) A corruption of Dia Madoc, that is, David, the son of Madoc, Dia being the diminutive of David among the Welsh. Madoc is derived from mad, good, with the termination oc affixed, which has the same effect as our English termination y.
DYMOCK
(Welsh.) A corruption of Dia Madoc, that is, David, the son of Madoc, Dia being the diminutive of David among the Welsh. Madoc is derived from mad, good, with the termination oc affixed, which has the same effect as our English termination y.
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